24
Aug
12

The TOP 6 Mortgage Mistakes

During the 2007-2009 financial crisis, the United States economy crumbled because of a problem with mortgage foreclosures. Borrowers all over the nation had trouble paying their mortgages. At the time, eight out of 10 borrowers were trying to refinance their mortgages. Even high-end homeowners were having trouble with foreclosures. Why were so many citizens having trouble with their mortgages? Let’s take a look at the biggest mortgage mistakes that homeowners make. 

1. Adjustable Rate Mortgages

Adjustable rate mortgages seem like a homeowners dream. An adjustable rate mortgage starts you off with a low interest rate for the first two to five years. They allow you to buy a larger house than you can normally qualify for and have lower payments that you can afford. After two to five years the interest rate resets to a higher market rate. That’s no problem because borrowers can just take the equity out of their homes and refinance to a lower rate once it resets.

Well, it doesn’t always work out that way. When housing prices drop, borrowers tend to find that they are unable to refinance their existing loans. This leaves many borrowers facing high mortgage payments that are two to three times their original payments. The dream of home ownership quickly becomes a nightmare.

2. No Down Payment

During the subprime crisis, many companies were offering borrowers no-down-payment loans to borrowers. The purpose of a down payment is twofold. First, it increases the amount of equity that you have in your home and reduces the amount of money that you owe on a home. Second, a down payment makes sure that you have some skin in the game. Borrowers who place down a large down payment are much more likely to try everything possible to make their mortgage payments since they do not want to lose their investment. Many borrowers who put little to nothing down on their homes find themselves upside down on their mortgage and end up just walking away. They owe more money than the home is worth. The more a borrower owes, the more likely they are to walk away.

3. Liar Loans

The phrase “liar loans” leaves a bad taste in your mouth. Liar loans were incredibly popular during the real estate boom prior to the subprime meltdown that began in 2007. Mortgage lenders were quick to hand them out and borrowers were quick to accept them. A liar loan is a loan that requires little to no documentation. Liar loans do not require verification. The loan is based on the borrower’s stated income, stated assets and stated expenses.

They are called liar loans because borrowers have a tendency to lie and inflate their income so that they can buy a larger house. Some individuals that received a liar loan did not even have a job! The trouble starts once the buyer gets in the home. Since the mortgage payments have to be paid with actual income and not stated income, the borrower is unable to consistently make their mortgage payments. They fall behind on the payments and find themselves facing bankruptcy and foreclosure.

[CLICK HERE] to continue reading this article

Thank you to By Mark Riddix, Investopedia.com 

Title Junction is always trying to keep the public informed…have questions you need answers to, don’t hestitate to ASK US!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Jennifer Ferri, Owner

Title Junction Archives

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 272 other followers

Twitter

Find Us On Thumbtack


%d bloggers like this: